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Salad Gardening
Published April 22, 2020 by Nicole Burke

Create a Cut and Come Again Salad Planter for Earth Day

Filed Under:
earth day
salad garden

Create a Cut and Come Again Salad Planter

Create a cut and come again salad planter with Nicole Burke author of Kitchen Garden Revival

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Wanna see the step by step in living color? Watch this tutorial on Instagram right here.

Cut and come again salad planter by Nicole Burke Author of Kitchen Garden Revival

Materials Needed

To create this cut and come again salad planter, you only need a few materials:

-A Container that's at least 1' Wide and about 1' Deep

-A Drill or Hammer/Nail to Create Drainage Holes

-Weed Barrier Cloth

-Scissors

-Organic Compost

-Lettuce Seeds or Plants

create your own cut and come again salad garden from Nicole Burke author of Kitchen Garden Revival
Make a Cut and Come Again Salad Planter with Nicole Burke Author of Kitchen Garden Revival

Step One

Create Good Drainage for Your Cut and Come Again Lettuce Planter

The first step is to create drainage holes in your container.

Salad plants like to be well watered but they don't like sitting in water.

By creating drainage holes, you'll ensure that your plants get the water they need but don't drown.

Create at least one drainage hole for every square foot of your planter.

If there's already a drainage hole, you can skip this step (obviously).

Materials needed to create a cut and come again salad planter taught by Nicole Burke author of Kitchen Garden Revival
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Step Two

Place a Weed Barrier Cloth at the Bottom of the Container

Cut a weed barrier cloth to the right dimensions to place at the bottom of your container.

This ensures that your soil (and all its nutrients) won't leach from your container as you water it or it receives rainfall over the season.

This isn't an absolute necessity but it's a great addition to ensure that the nutrients from your soil stays in your container as your salad grows over the season.

Cut and come again salad planter from Nicole Burke author of Kitchen Garden Revival

Step Three

Fill Your Container With Organic Compost

I'm keeping it simple in this step. Let's just use 100% compost to grow our salad plants.

Salad plants thrive in compost and will do really well even if you use just one simple ingredient to grow your cut and come again salad planter.

The only thing: be certain you maintain a consistent watering plan for your salad garden.

Salad plants don't like to dry out and compost won't hold water as well as a clay based or top soil based soil mixture will do.

You can make your own compost or find one at your local nursery (or from a local farmer). Just be sure the compost is completely cured before using it in your cut and come again salad planter.

Install compost in your cut and come again salad planter from Nicole Burke author of Kitchen Garden Revival
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Step Four

Plant Your Cut and Come Again Salad

Now it's time to fill your cut and come again salad planter with some actual salad.

You can use just one packet of salad seeds for this project or you can plant small salad seedlings. Both work.

In general, it's better to start salad plants from seed because they have fragile root systems and don't transplant well.

You can use a variety of lettuce types in your cut and come again salad planter.

Here are a few of my favorites:

Romaine

Buttercrunch

Spinach

Rocky Top Lettuce Mix

After you plant your lettuces, carefully water in your salad planter around each and every plant or very gently over the seeds you've just installed.

Keep your salad planter in a spot that receives at least four hours of sunlight and check the water moisture level everyday to be sure your planter isn't dry (or too wet).

If you've planted cut and come again salad seeds, be sure your container's soil doesn't get dry in the least bit until those seeds have sprouted. Once lettuce seeds begin to open up and grow, they don't like to dry out.

Cut and Come Again Salad Planter by Nicole Burke author of Kitchen Garden Revival

Step Five

Enjoy Your Cut and Come Again Salad (and Skip Past the Grocery Store Boxes)


If you installed plants in your cut and come again planter, you can start harvesting from the outside of your plants right away.

Cut a few leaves from the outside of each plant and leave the center leaves of the plant to keep on growing.

It's literally, 'cut' and 'come again.' Get it?

If you've planted seeds, give your seeds a few weeks to sprout and start growing before cutting.

If your seeds come up too close together, take time to thin them by cutting the one to two inch tall seedlings at the soil level and enjoy them as microgreens or sprouts as a topping on a sandwich or soup.

In about 45 days, you can start harvesting from your cut and come again salad planter and changing the world for the better.

Every time you grow a little of your own salad, you make a huge difference in the world.

Each piece of lettuce you harvest from your porch or patio means less fuel, less packaging and less waste for our country's food system.

Cut and come again salad planter by Nicole Burke author of Kitchen Garden Revival
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